Courses

355:201 Research in the Disciplines

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Coordinator:  Lynda Dexheimer

Students in 201 complete research projects on topics of their own choosing within various fields of study.  See the options for Spring 2015 below. 201 will help you gain valuable expertise in your topic area, learn how to do research, and improve your writing abilities.

  • SAS Students:  201 is a Core Certified course meeting both WCr and WCd requirements for Writing and Communication Goals.
  • SEBS Students;  201 meets Core Curriculum Requirements in Area VI: Oral and Written Communication.
  • Other Students:  201 satisfies requirements for most schools.  Check with your advisor.

College Avenue

 

COMMUNICATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE

355:201:04 15372         T3 (11:30 – 12:50)           SC-102 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: M. WAHBA

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

 Texts. Emails. Facebook. Twitter. Linkedin. G-chat. Skype. The way we communicate has changed over time and the channels of communication seem to be ever increasing.  This course gives students an opportunity to research and explore changes in communication in the context of the digital age.  Examples of research options include topics such as the changes in language attributable to increased electronic communication, the loss of a message's meaning on social media, the importance of (or lack thereof) body language in communication, and the effects of increased connectivity on communication. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON LIVINGSTON CAMPUS.

  

SCIENCE, MEDICINE & SOCIETY

355:201:05 12961         T4 (1:10-2:30)                CA-A1 CAC                             INSTRUCTOR: E. OLDFATHER

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

 355:201:09 08983         TH3 (11:30 – 12:50)       MU-114 CAC                          INSTRUCTOR: E. OLDFATHER

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

 “Science, Medicine, and Society” focuses on ethical, social, and political controversies in a variety of medical and health fields.  Research topics include biomedical engineering, nursing, pharmaceutical and insurance industries, health care, mental illness, alternative and experimental healing techniques, hospice, hospitals, and midwives.  Students can also study aspects of medical training and the doctor-patient relationship. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON COLLEGE AVENUE AND LIVINGSTON CAMPUSES. 

 

COLLEGE!

355:201:07 11269         T6 (4:30 – 5:50)               SC-214  CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: M. GOELLER

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

This course explores the changing meaning of college in America, with a focus on the increasing privatization of public education.  Research topics might include the rising costs of college and matching student debt, the disconnect between student life and academics, the stressful competition for admission to the most selective schools, the expense of remedial education, the rise of big time college sports as a revenue stream, the history of student protest movements, the role of fraternities and sororities, and the complex relationship between faculty and corporations. As part of the class, students will be required to conduct at least one primary source interview that is appropriate to their projects. This is a hybrid course with meetings one day each week supplemented by online activities, which will include keeping a research blog and participating in online discussion forums.

 

EVERYDAY ETHICS

355:201:08 12962         TH3 (11:30 – 12:50)       SC-221 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: A. BOUHLAS

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

From the big issues like abortion, sexuality, suicide, euthanasia, punishment, war, and famine to the small actions taken on a daily basis, human beings are constantly confronted with the tricky business of morality. In this course, we will examine scholarly debates over ethics and moral obligations in various areas of life, and you will become an expert on a small slice of this domain as you conduct your own research. During the semester, you will have the opportunity to sort out in a rigorous fashion debates about right and wrong, where humans’ moral obligations lie, and why you think that is.

 

STORIES WE TELL

355:201:A1 12966        MW2 (9:50 – 11:10)        SC-204 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: D. KEATES

What’s your personal narrative? What are the stories you tell and listen to that make you who you are? Storytelling shapes identity and can be first-person accounts about relationships, honoring the dead, journeys, adventures, faith, politics and accomplishments. It is also living history as in the thousands of stories that make a culture’s collective identity. Storytelling is digital, written, oral, image, song and dance and never before have so many diverse fields used the power of the story in their work. Storytelling played a role in evolution, and today is practiced at every cultural level, from riots in Africa to boardrooms, from the porches of rural America to hospitals, from churches, mosques and temples to the courthouse – and your house. Research topics have included investigating how story relates to voodoo healing, an Indian epic tale, cigarette ad campaigns, Palestinian exile, photos from the civil rights era, classical music, the paintings of Jacob Lawrence, dementia treatment, hip hop dance and chocolate.  Yes, chocolate.

 

WHAT ARE “THE HUMANITIES”?

 355:201:A2 20284        MW2 (9:50 – 11:10)        FH-A2   CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: A. KOTCH

What does it mean to pursue study in the humanities? What value do the humanities bring to people’s understanding of the pressing issues of the age? How might humanistic thinking shape the future and reveal the wonderful possibilities and the unintended consequences of change? This course allows students to explore the relevance of 21st century humanities study in the workplace, the modern university, public discourse, and everyday life. Come find the human in our ever-changing world and become part of a community of thinkers.

 

PLAYING GAY: LGBTQ MEDIA IMAGES

355:201:A3 00212        MTH2 (9:50 – 11:10)     CA-A2 CAC                             INSTRUCTOR: M. BETANCOURT

 From TV series like Glee and Looking, to the Oscar-winning film Dallas Buyers Club, to out actors like Ellen Page, Zachary Quinto, and Matt Bomer, it seems we are currently living in a world where LGBQT characters and actors have gone mainstream. In what ways are these media portrayals necessary for the political advocacy of the LGBQT community? Who controls these media representations and how do they contribute to the stereotypes about the gay community that permeate our culture? Must all minority media representation be committed to embrace a positive celebration of the LGBQT community? Building on a discussion of these questions, students will develop original and diverse research projects on topics that may include the intersection between race and sexuality in film, sexuality in the news, transgender identity in the media, GLAAD’s work on gay media representation, reality TV and sexual inclusivity, or out performers and the politics of the closet. Students of any sex, gender, and sexuality are welcome to join our discussion!

 

PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES

355:201:A4 16344        MTH2 (9:50 – 11:10)     CA-A1 CAC                             INSTRUCTOR: L. COOLIDGE

Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, research for disease and injury prevention, and development of policies that help make the home, workplace and public sphere safe. This course allows the student to research the intersection of health concerns with many other disciplines – public policy, psychology, history, sociology and science. The choices for research papers range from family planning to studying infectious disease outbreaks to biochemical terrorist attacks. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON LIVINGSTON CAMPUS.

 

AMERICA AT WAR

355:201:A6 06903        MTH3 (11:30 – 12:50)    HH-B3 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: P. HERMAN

 War is a funny thing.  It seems as though everything we do in America has a war connected to it.  We go to war against drugs and cancer and poverty and terrorism and crime and birth control and the middle class and labor and women and Christmas, and this doesn't even mention the wars of Revolution or 1812 or Civil or Spanish-American or I and II  ....  you get the idea.  In this course you will explore and develop a special interest in the theme of war, and research and write about a particular kind of active hostility or contention between living beings, opposing forces, or principles.  But is war a funny thing?  Come explore the tragedy or the humor, and perhaps even both, of America at War.

 

NATURAL DISASTERS

355:201:A7 16191        MTH3 (11:30 – 12:50)    HH-A2  CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: L. COOLIDGE

Once a natural disaster has occurred, what impact does it have on society?  The immediate needs of survival may bring discordant groups together to support each other, such as in Oakland, California after the 1991 earthquake. In that case, residents who lived nearby in poorer neighborhoods rescued people from wealthy areas stranded in cars on the damaged freeways.  Other times, simmering differences can erupt, leading to antagonism and bloodshed. Natives in Indonesia took up arms against the Dutch colonists after Krakatoa erupted in 1883, because they felt the gods were clearly displeased with the decadent society. As for government officials, they may emerge as heroes who attempt to save their community or scapegoats to blame for the suffering and loss. Students in this course will look at past records of natural disasters and study their impact on the societies that were affected.  How did the societies cope? What supports were in place to help? Who were the most affected by the disaster? Clues to building resilient societies may be evident in how they rise from the ashes.

 

FEMINISM FOR EVERYONE

355:201:B2 05417        MW4 (1:10 – 2:30)           SC-216 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: A. KING

Regardless of age, race, gender, class, or sexual orientation, feminism is relevant to everyone. In this course we will explore the roots of the feminist movement, modern-day issues within feminism, the misconceptions about what it means to be a feminist, and the ways in which feminism is relevant to today’s Rutgers students.  Drawing on a wide range of sources from Mary Wollstonecraft to Sarah Silverman, from blogs to books, from fashion magazines to photographic archives, we will delve into feminism as not just an isolated movement, but one that intersects with myriad modern-day issues in politics, the sciences, sports, the arts, and pop culture.

 

SECULAR AND SPIRITUAL

355:201:B3 04292        MW5 (2:50 – 4:10)           SC-205 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: D. DOW

What is the place of spirituality in a modern world? Are increasingly secular societies leaving traditional faiths behind? Are these societies neglecting a crucial dimension of human experience? Are they following out an inevitable progression toward rationality and common sense?  In this class we'll be looking at these questions and others as we investigate the competing claims of the worldly and the sacred. Possible paper topics include secular ethics and modern medicine, science and atheism, religion and music, the role of the sacred in environmental movements, fundamentalism and global politics, the debate over headscarves and female modesty, the increasing number of nonbelievers in America, and many others.NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON DOUGLASS CAMPUS.

 

THE CHANGING WORKPLACE

355:201:B4 16236        MW5 (2:50 – 4:10)           FH-A3 CAC                            INSTRUCTOR: I. MARKEY

What does it mean to work for a living in twenty-first century America? How do social changes play out in the workplace? How do changes in business practices affect the nation? This course examines the way work affects the employee and how employee concerns impact management. Possible research topics include the move toward consulting, living on minimum wage, gender in the workplace, the decline of labor unions, privacy issues, the global economy, corporate culture, childcare concerns, healthcare, retirement benefits, job security, sexual harassment, discrimination, outsourcing, small business, trade agreements, and government regulations. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON LIVINGSTON CAMPUS.

 

EXPLORING ASIA: CULTURE, HISTORY AND SOCIETY OF INDIA, CHINA, JAPAN, KOREA AND SOUTHEAST ASIA

355:201:B6 11422        MW6 (4:30 – 5:50)           HH-A1 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: L. SMITH

How are the ways that we think about Asia changing in our rapidly transforming world? Contemporary India and China, for example, are among the world's most influential nations economically, technologically, and politically. South Korea is currently a world leader in digital innovation. Human rights issues in India, China, Myanmar, and other Asian countries regularly make headlines in Western media. This course will explore a range of topics relating to the diverse cultures of Asia, both classical and contemporary. Among issues addressed will be globalization, human rights, orientalism, and the relevance of Eurocentric notions of East and West. 

 

THE ENVIRONMENT

355:201:B8 14891           MW7 (6:10 – 7:30)           SC-216 CAC                        INSTRUCTOR: N. McAULIFFE

Have you heard that by the year 2050 Alaska will no longer have polar bears?  Did you know that Glacier National Park will soon become a park without glaciers?  Did you know that elephants are "cracking up"?  Have you ever considered how Thoreau changed the face of environmental writing, or how Rachel Carson started the environmental movement with her book Silent Spring?  In this course students will explore all things environmental: economics, science, technology, ecology, politics, policy, practice, activism, international relations, energy, and art.

  

MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE & FAIRY TALES

355:201:C2 14348         TF2 (9:20 – 11:10)           FH-A1 CAC                            INSTRUCTOR: M. CINNIRELLA

 Myths, folklore and fairy tales persist and evolve across generations and cultures and their variations have profoundly different effects on the human psyche.  What we know as “Beauty and the Beast” has also been “The Pig King,” “The Frog King,” and “The Tiger’s Bride” as the story has changed to satisfy the needs of the culture at a given time.  How do the issues addressed in such stories influence people’s experience of the world?  Can their enchantments give readers the power to find meaning by evoking cultural experiences of the past or providing a collective cultural awareness?  How do changes in stories over time help explain shifts in social norms? Possible research topics include the history of particular stories, the cultural significance of the values presented in the stories, escapism through storytelling, and more.

 

SCIENCE FICTION AND FANSTASY

355:201:C3 12791         TF3 (11:30 – 12:50)        HH-A1 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: M. CINNIRELLA

Elements of science fiction and fantasy stories can be used to dramatize contemporary problems. How does escape into "otherworlds" like Oz or Panem change the dimensions not only of social and psychological identity, but also of broader social and cultural structures such as race, gender, and class? How does painting a speculative framework allow for explorations of uncharted or sensitive concepts? Drawing from Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, and beyond, this class will examine the foreign landscapes of Science Fiction and Fantasy where heightened conditions shine a new light on human identity and the perspective of self and society, providing a reflection of new-found knowledge and truth closer to home, in the world we know.

  

FASHION

355:201:D2 02344        TTH5 (2:50 – 4:10)         HH-A5 CAC                           INSTRUCTOR: A. ALTER

How did something as essential as clothing evolve into something as frivolous as fashion, constantly changing and regularly discarded? How did the verb "to fashion", which means, "to make," end up as a noun that describes the latest and hottest garment to be worn, a word synonymous with change? This class will explore these questions. We will also examine how fashion is used to define individuals and how fashion is a form of communication and culture with rules, values, and prohibitions. From fashion design and designers, to beauty and marketing, to subcultures and politics, this course will look at fashion as a social and cultural language today. Some possible research topics are: the cultural significance of specific designers; an examination of fashion trends as subculture; or a history of cosmetic use and its evolution in the last 100 years.

 

 Busch

SCIENCE, MEDICINE & SOCIETY

355:201:02 19653         T3 (12-1:20)                  ARC-326 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: K. WILFORD

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

 

355:201:F5 12952         TTH6 (5-6:20)                ARC-324 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: K. THOMPSON

“Science, Medicine, and Society” focuses on ethical, social, and political controversies in a variety of medical and health fields.  Research topics include biomedical engineering, nursing, pharmaceutical and insurance industries, health care, mental illness, alternative and experimental healing techniques, hospice, hospitals, and midwives.  Students can also study aspects of medical training and the doctor-patient relationship. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON COLLEGE AVENUE AND LIVINGSTON CAMPUSES.

 

TECHNOLOGY

355:201:14 19759         T3 (12-1:20)                  ARC-324 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: S. SYREK

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

 Technology sells the promise of doing more and more for us: one million apps and counting; drugs for all problems; TV on demand; self-driving cars; 3D printing; Internet in your glasses; etc. Yet side-by-side with state of the art tech, we find mounting chaos in the United States: government gridlock; epidemic obesity; environmental degradation; privacy invasions; economic stagnation; debt crises, etc. This course offers students the opportunity to read and analyze research that may help connect the dots between the promise and the chaos, to step backstage and ask: Does technical progress really equal human progress? Or is the rising technical order at the expense of human/environmental chaos? Or both? NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON LIVINGSTON CAMPUS.

 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS RELATIONS

355:201:E1 12887         MTH3 (12- 1:20)               ARC-326 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: K. YENIYURT

This course considers the objectives and strategies of international business in the context of global competition. Student research options include topics such as cross-cultural differences in business practices, international trade differences, outsourcing, the International Monetary System, currency disputes, global competition, trade wars, and the role of organizations such as the United Nations, NAFTA, and the World Trade Organization.

 

HEALTH CARE ETHICS

355:201:E3 19654         MW5 (3:20 – 4:40)           ARC-324 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: E. HAQQ-STEVENS

“Healthcare Ethics” focuses on the how personal, cultural, community and political ethics affect the practice and delivery of healthcare. Research topics include medicine, doctor/nurse patient relationship, mental illness, alternative and experimental healing, western and eastern medicine, nursing, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering and insurance industries. Students can also study how personal, cultural and religious views influence the practice and delivery of healthcare.

 

NUTRITION AND EXERCISE SCIENCE

355:201:E4 19760         MW6 (5 - 6:20)                ARC-324 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: H. SWERDLOFF

 

355:201:E6 12487         W2, 3 (10:20 – 1:20)       ARC-326 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: E. HAQQ-STEVENS

This class meets once per week for three hours

 This course gives students an opportunity to research nutrition and exercise strategies for optimal wellness.  Research options include topics such as training techniques; sports pedagogy; training and diet for athletes; diet and/or exercise as treatment for or prevention of disease; nutrition and exercise for pregnant women; childhood obesity; occupational therapy; physical therapy; sports medicine; weight management; eating disorders; food insecurity; etc. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON LIVINGSTON CAMPUS.

 

MOTIVATION AND SUCCESS

355:201:E5 16090         W1, 2 (8:40 – 11:40)       ARC-324 BUSCH                INSTRUCTOR: J. MESSINA

This class meets once per week for three hours

This course explores the science of motivation and the psychology of success. Research topics may include topics related to developmental psychology, social psychology, personality psychology, theories about motivation and achievement, intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation, self-control and self-regulation. We will examine the work of Carol Dweck, Tony Wagner and Daniel Pink, among others, to help students develop their own research projects.

 

Livingston

 

THE ETHICS OF FOOD

355:201:12 05212         M2 (10:20 – 11:40)          LSH-B112 LIV                             INSTRUTOR: T. BENDER

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

"Don't eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn't recognize as food," Michael Pollan advised in his bestselling book, In Defense of Food. In our busy contemporary society, we cram down French fries that don't grow mold if we forget to eat them for a month; foot long sandwiches stuffed with processed meats; fizzy drinks of a dazzling array of colors. This course will explore the ethics of food, in terms of its production and distribution. Possible topics of research include an investigation of the ethics of the fast food industry, genetically modified foods, factory farms, agribusinesses, organic foods, food waste, and the recent increase in interest for local produce in farmers' markets, and rooftop farming in urban areas. PLEASE NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON THE DOUGLASS CAMPUS.

 

COLLABORATION

355:201:15 19782         T3 (12 – 1:20)                   LSH-A121 LIV                            INSTRUCTOR: J. WARREN

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

Why is it that so many great innovations are the result of a dynamic compilation of like-minded individuals? From the prolific songwriting team of John Lennon and Paul McCartney of the Beatles, to the groundbreaking computer developments of Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs of Apple Computers, to the teams of nameless staff writers working to create the next hit television sitcom, there are often two or more architects responsible for the creation. This course will explore how collaboration has impacted the arts, business, education and many other fields.  There will be a particular emphasis on how collaboration impacts technology and how technology, in turn, affects collaboration. Students from any major field of study are welcome to join and are encouraged to work across disciplines with your new creative partners!

 

LOVE AND SEX

355:201:17 15373         T4 (1:40 – 3)                       BE-250 LIV                            INSTRUCTOR: J. HOFFMAN

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

355:201:22 13229         Th6 (5 – 6:20)                     LSH-A121 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: A. BOUHLAS

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

 

Most songs, novels, and movies focus on the same theme: love.  How can we define love?  What is the difference between loving someone and being in love?  In this course, students will investigate the ways in which love and sex affect cultural traditions, gender norms, and the human condition.  We will look at controversial issues that arise when people defy, redefine, or revisit cultural and social norms associated with love and sex.  Possible topics include acts of flirtation, gay marriage, public displays of affection, serial killers and necrophilia, sexuality in comic books, female genital mutilation, Internet sex addiction, sexual predators, and pornography. 

 

PICTURING ATROCITY

355:201:18 08769         T5 (3:20 – 4:40)                 TIL-123 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: J. HOFFMAN

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

This course will allow students to examine the history of human atrocities through the lens of photography and visual media, asking how we understand such atrocities that defy the imagination. The course will begin with a short paper that pays particular attention to representations of trauma from the Holocaust and the ethical questions that come from looking at the pain of others. By focusing on how images relate to words, students will examine questions of representation, imagination, and history. Topics might include how artists have struggled with this history, Hollywood's depictions of the nightmare of atrocity, documentary evidence from historical events, and the fantasies of witnessing that have concerned scholars in recent studies.

  

HUMOR AND COMEDY

355:201:19 05415         T6 (5 – 6:20)                        TIL-123 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: J. COHEN

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

 Humans use humor on a daily basis.  But why do we use humor, and what are the larger implications of employing jest to make a statement?  This course allows students to investigate humor, comedy, and laughter through a variety of academic lenses.  Students can research and analyze such topics as political satire, popular cartoons, stand-up routines, comedians, ethnic and cultural humor, sit-coms, YouTube antics, bloopers, vaudeville, The Simpsons, South Park, Family Guy, film, video, and comic books. 

  

COMMUNICATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE

355:201:E7 19805         MW7 (6:40 – 8)                  TIL-127 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: N. TUCKSON

 Texts. Emails. Facebook. Twitter. Linkedin. G-chat. Skype. The way we communicate has changed over time and the channels of communication seem to be ever increasing.  This course gives students an opportunity to research and explore changes in communication in the context of the digital age.  Examples of research options include topics such as the changes in language attributable to increased electronic communication, the loss of a message's meaning on social media, the importance of (or lack thereof) body language in communication, and the effects of increased connectivity on communication. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS.

  

ISSUES IN EDUCATION

355:201:J1 07200          MW2 (10:20 – 11:40)         BE-213 LIV                           INSTRUCTOR: N. CHOWDHURY

 Education is a hot topic in media discussions, on the campaign trail, and even around the family dinner table because of controversies over issues as diverse as student debt and cyber bullying. This course will cut through the sound bytes to explore real research on important topics such as teacher accountability, tuition hikes, high stakes testing, gender and learning, equality of education, school climate, the technology gap, funding crises, and charter schools, among many others. Students will explore how teaching practices, education policy and pedagogical ideals affect what and how people learn, and how that learning then affects the entire fabric of a society. Are the only options to either join the “Race to Nowhere” or remain “Waiting for Superman”? Come and find out!

 

CONSTRUCTING IDENTITIES

355:201:J2 19740          MW3 (12 – 1:20)               LSH-B267 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: D. LILLEY

355:201:M4 04349       TF3 (12 – 1:20)                   BE-101 LIV                            INSTRUCTOR: L. SCHMID

Who are you? Is your identity fixed or is it always changing? How much of what makes you “you” comes from how others see you? How does identity intersect with values, beliefs, race, ethnicity, gender, nationality, language, religion, family, music, fashion, history and so on? This course explores multiple and overlapping ways humans perceive themselves, both as individuals and as part of a collective group, and how identity affects people’s lived experiences every day. We will examine the relationship between environment and psychological and biological selves. Possible areas of research include musical preference, fashion style, race relations, self-help books, plastic surgery, and national pride.

  

NUTRITION AND EXERCISE SCIENCE

355:201:J3 11630          MTH2 (10:20 – 11:40)          TIL-105 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: H. DEL PRETE

This course gives students an opportunity to research nutrition and exercise strategies for optimal wellness.  Research options include topics such as training techniques; sports pedagogy; training and diet for athletes; diet and/or exercise as treatment for or prevention of disease; nutrition and exercise for pregnant women; childhood obesity; occupational therapy; physical therapy; sports medicine; weight management; eating disorders; food insecurity; etc. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON BUSCH CAMPUS.

 

THE CHANGING WORKPLACE

355:201:J4 12793          MTH3 (12 – 1:20)             BE-101 LIV                           INSTRUCTOR: D. CANTOR

What does it mean to work for a living in twenty-first century America? How do social changes play out in the workplace? How do changes in business practices affect the nation? This course examines the way work affects the employee and how employee concerns impact management. Possible research topics include the move toward consulting, living on minimum wage, gender in the workplace, the decline of labor unions, privacy issues, the global economy, corporate culture, childcare concerns, healthcare, retirement benefits, job security, sexual harassment, discrimination, outsourcing, small business, trade agreements, and government regulations.

  

SCIENCE, MEDICINE AND SOCIETY

355:201:J5 14890          MTH3 (12 – 1:20)             TIL-252 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: H. DEL PRETE

 “Science, Medicine, and Society” focuses on ethical, social, and political controversies in a variety of medical and health fields.  Research topics include biomedical engineering, nursing, pharmaceutical and insurance industries, health care, mental illness, alternative and experimental healing techniques, hospice, hospitals, and midwives.  Students can also study aspects of medical training and the doctor-patient relationship. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON COLLEGE AVENUE AND LIVINGSTON CAMPUSES.

 

JUSTICE AND THE LAW

355:201:J6 19741          MTH3 (12 – 1:20)             TIL-103D LIV                      INSTRUCTOR: J. BALLINGER

Justice, in its most basic sense, can be defined as the fair treatment of people in a civil society through the political enactment, administration, and enforcement of law, which in the United States is embodied by the Constitution. In this course, we will examine the theoretical and practical foundations of justice in our society, especially the “social contract” between the individual and the state. We will analyze the extent to which our government and its legal system have succeeded in upholding the ideals enshrined in the US Constitution.  Possible topics include discrimination and civil rights, the death penalty, abortion, free speech, citizenship, gay rights, affirmative action, voting rights, and the rights of the accused.  

 

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CONFLICT

355:201:K4 02521        MW4 (1:40 – 3)                  LSH-B105 LIV                     INSTRUCTOR: B. FISHER

“Can we all get along?” Rodney King touched the soul of the nation in 1992 with this simple but insightful question because it poses fundamental human concerns:  why do we fight with our family, friends, and loved ones?  Why is argument the basis of so much of education and business? Why do gender, class, race, and ethnic groups sometimes fight over core values and backgrounds?  Why do nations go to war?  “Psychology of Conflict” will allow students to address these issues and more.  Conflict may not always lend itself to resolution, but resolution can often be managed.  Investigation of techniques for conflict resolution can provide an additional avenue for student research.

 

TABOOS AND TRANSGRESSIONS

355:201:K5 11448        MW4 (1:40-3)                     BE-121 LIV                           INSTRUCTOR: D. LILLEY

 

What activities are we expected not to entertain publically or even privately?  Sexual deviance, death rituals, illicit drug use—why do certain taboos both appall us and appeal to us at the same time?  And who gets to decide what's forbidden?  In this course we will consider how our ideas of transgressions have changed throughout the years and what new codes of conduct we're expected to abide by today.  Topics of exploration include all things offensive, disobedient, and unmentionable.  

 

SURVEILLANCE AND PRIVACY

355:201:K8 00213        MW5 (3:20 – 4:40)           BE-201 LIV                           INSTRUCTOR: B. FISHER

Americans often seem shocked when revelations of government snooping into citizens' phone calls and emails come to light, yet the same Americans are entertained by fictionalized TV intelligence and surveillance thrillers such as "Person of Interest" and "Homeland." Moreover, millions of Americans routinely publish their personal information on Facebook and other social media for the world to see.  What expectations of privacy can we expect in a world in which surveillance has become so easy and so common?  And if the government is collecting data on us, how is this different from the private corporations that do so as well? What is or should be secret today? In this course, students will explore and research the intersection between the reality of surveillance and the changing expectations of privacy.

  

INCARCERATION: THE ERA OF MASS IMPRISONMENT

355:201:K9 16237        MW6 (5 – 6:20)                  LSH-B205 LIV                     INSTRUCTOR: N. TUCKSON

The United States has one of the highest rates of incarceration in the Western world: a status gained through tougher drug and sentencing laws in the 1970s that increased the imprisoned population by multiple factors. In this class, we will explore the legal and social phenomena that led to this increase, as well as the responses and alternatives that are being posed. Topics that students can explore in individual research projects include: prison overcrowding, the death penalty, social and educational rehabilitation, the impact of race and class on arrest rates, sentencing reform, the juvenile justice system, the growth of private (for-profit) prisons, lifetime voting bans and/or the social stigmatization of ex-offenders, and myths about imprisonment that may affect social responses to the issue.

 

COMICS AND GRAPHIC NOVELS

201:201:P1 02655         TTH4 (1:40 – 3)                 LSH-B110 LIV                     INSTRUCTOR: J. FLYNN

This course focuses on graphic narrative of all kinds. Students will have the opportunity to explore topics related to comics art, from superheroes to manga, DC to Dark Horse, and Kirby to Bechdel. Through this course, you can investigate everything from what makes something a comic to how the industry is run.  Possible research topics include women in comics, comics marketing, differences among Japanese, European, and American comics, and the iconic nature of superheroes.

 

FILM

355:201:P2 11423         TTH4 (1:40 – 3)                 BE-219 LIV                           INSTRUCTOR: G. SCHROEPFER

E.T. The dance of death at sunset. Gangsters, hangovers, and martial arts.   A slum dog millionaire. Perhaps no other art form in the last century has left an impact on culture the way that film has. Through the images on screen, audiences engage in their hopes and fears, find their heroes, and confront their demons. Hollywood, Bollywood, the indie, the foreign film, documentaries and animation--the categories that fall under the art form have left a lasting legacy on our imaginations. This course will explore the nature of film as an art form and look at its power to inspire and enchant. Students may write about the lasting influence of a particular film, a director, or the significance of a genre.

 

TECHNOLOGY

355:201:P3 04350         TTH4 (1:40 – 3)                 TIL-209 LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: J. ROBBINS

 Technology sells the promise of doing more and more for us: one million apps and counting; drugs for all problems; TV on demand; self-driving cars; 3D printing; Internet in your glasses; etc. Yet side-by-side with state of the art tech, we find mounting chaos in the United States: government gridlock; epidemic obesity; environmental degradation; privacy invasions; economic stagnation; debt crises, etc. This course offers students the opportunity to read and analyze research that may help connect the dots between the promise and the chaos, to step backstage and ask: Does technical progress really equal human progress? Or is the rising technical order at the expense of human/environmental chaos? Or both? NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON BUSCH CAMPUS.

 

PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES

355:201:P4 16192         T4, BE-201 TH4, TIL-252 (1:40 – 3)  LIV                         INSTRUCTOR: J. EVANS

Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, research for disease and injury prevention, and development of policies that help make the home, workplace and public sphere safe. This course allows the student to research the intersection of health concerns with many other disciplines – public policy, psychology, history, sociology and science. The choices for research papers range from family planning to studying infectious disease outbreaks to biochemical terrorist attacks. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS.

 

MUSIC OF THE MOMENT

355:201:P5 12950         TH5, 6 (3:20 – 6:20)        TIL-123 LIV                           INSTRUCTOR: B. FARBERMAN

This class meets once per week for three hours

Paralleling the rapid succession from LP to MP3, the ways in which we think about music have evolved dramatically over the past hundred years or so. What’s the difference between composition and improvisation? Do seemingly disparate styles have more in common than we think? What separates music from sound or noise? Is sample-based music creative? Should we pay for music? We’ll seek to answer questions like these, and examine the “universal language” from a wide variety of twenty-first century angles and perspectives.

 

THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY

355:201:P7 10173         TTH6 (5 – 6:20)                 LSH-B109 LIV                     INSTRUCTOR: G. SCHROEPFER

The nature of the American presidency is crucial to any understanding of the United States. The president presides over the executive branch, yet exercises an enormous—and lasting—influence over both the judicial and legislative branches of the federal government. This course allows students to examine the wide ramifications of a presidential administration. Topics include crisis leadership from the Alien and Sedition Acts to 9/11, Obamacare and beyond. Students could develop projects that examine the success or failure of a specific policy; the presidential advisors and cabinet members who have played important roles in every administration from Washington to Obama; how federal agencies wield their extraordinary influence, for example, the WPA under FDR and the CIA and FBI in the Nixon administration; and the roles played by vice presidents and First Ladies. The American Presidency offers the student a great opportunity to discover not only who leads but why, and how that leadership leaves the legacy it does in history. 

 

Douglass/Cook

 

INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

355:201:25 15306         W2 (10:55 – 12:15)             HCK-207 D/C                      INSTRUCTOR: T. BENDER

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

"A child's story which is enjoyed only by a child is a bad child's story. The good ones last." So said C.S. Lewis, referring to children’s books standing the test of time. But can children’s books stand the test of place as well? Against a theoretical background of Tony Watkins' piece, "Space, History and Culture: the Setting of Children's Literature," we will read stories for children from other lands, including The Baboon King by Anton Quintana, translated from Dutch and set in tribal East Africa; The Friends by Kazumi Yumoto, translated from Japanese and set in a Japanese city; The Clay Marble, by Minfong Ho, which is set in Cambodia during the Vietnam War; The Man From the Other Side by Uri Orlev, translated from Hebrew and set in Warsaw during the ghetto uprisings.  Possible research topics include examining how various cultural differences and values are reflected in international children’s stories of the student’s own choice.

 

THE ENVIRONMENT

355:201:30 04633           TTh (2:15 – 3:35)           HCK-130 D/C                      INSTRUCTOR: D. BORIE-HOLTZ

This is a hybrid course that meets on campus once per week and requires substantial online participation

Have you heard that by the year 2050 Alaska will no longer have polar bears?  Did you know that Glacier National Park will soon become a park without glaciers?  Did you know that elephants are "cracking up"?  Have you ever considered how Thoreau changed the face of environmental writing, or how Rachel Carson started the environmental movement with her book Silent Spring?  In this course students will explore all things environmental: economics, science, technology, ecology, politics, policy, practice, activism, international relations, energy, and art.

  

MODERN FAMILY

355:201:S2 00214         MTH2 (10:55 – 12:15)          HCK-131 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: J. LOEB

Americans are now living in families that come in many more varieties than the stereotypical 1950s nuclear family.  Millions of families are structured around same-sex marriage, unwed parents, adoption, divorce, remarriage, intergenerational living, and so on.  Individual research projects will address various topics under the large umbrella of “modern family”:  step families; military families; extended family; abuse within families; single-parent families; stay-at-home fathers; cultural representations of family, etc. Bring your individual interests and explore!

  

CREATIVITY

355:201:S3 13217         MTH2 (10:55 – 12:15)           HCK-115 D/C                 INSTRUCTOR: D. LALLAS

 Exploring creativity! Where does it come from—the cosmos, the muses, our DNA? Do creative people think outside the “box?” What is the “box?” How do we break through to our innate originality and live it rather than conceal it in order to fit in?  Are imagination, innovation, and inspiration the exclusive domain of the arts and sciences, or essential components for enriching our lives as well as our diverse profession?  Those are some of the issues we’ll investigate.  Research topics to consider include: creative ability and autism; effects of drugs on creative output; advertising and creative persuasion; the dark side and curse of creativity; left-handedness; the use of the Golden Mean—the mysterious number employed to establish order and beauty in art.  Ultimately, you’re free to follow your inspiration to discover other related topics.

  

SECULAR AND SPIRITUAL

355:201:S4 15307         MTH3 (12:35 – 1:55)     HCK-209 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: D. DOW

What is the place of spirituality in a modern world? Are increasingly secular societies leaving traditional faiths behind? Are these societies neglecting a crucial dimension of human experience? Are they following out an inevitable progression toward rationality and common sense?  In this class we'll be looking at these questions and others as we investigate the competing claims of the worldly and the sacred. Possible paper topics include secular ethics and modern medicine, science and atheism, religion and music, the emergence of new forms or traditions of spirituality, the role of the sacred in environmental movements, fundamentalism and global politics, the revival of Jewish orthodoxy, the debate over headscarves and female modesty, the increasing number of nonbelievers in America, and many others. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON COLLEGE AVENUE CAMPUS.

 

LAW, ORDER AND MEDIA

355:201:S5 12792         MTH3 (12:35 – 1:55)     HCK-117 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: M. OLTARZEWSKI

This course will explore our culture's fascination with law enforcement and the justice system.  Students will discuss and research the glamorization of the pursuit of justice, and the link between law and entertainment as seen in novels and "true crime" literature, films, theater, television, and news media.  A wide variety of topics will be examined and analyzed, but students are encouraged to come to class with their own viewpoints on crime and punishment, as they have been presented in today's culture and throughout history.

 

THE ETHICS OF FOOD

355:201:S6 12967         MW4 (2:15 – 3:35)           HCK-114 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: T. BENDER

 "Don't eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn't recognize as food," Michael Pollan advised in his bestselling book, In Defense of Food. In our busy contemporary society, we cram down French fries that don't grow mold if we forget to eat them for a month; foot long sandwiches stuffed with processed meats; fizzy drinks of a dazzling array of colors. This course will explore the ethics of food, in terms of its production and distribution. Possible topics of research include an investigation of the ethics of the fast food industry, genetically modified foods, factory farms, agribusinesses, organic foods, food waste, and the recent increase in interest for local produce in farmers' markets, and rooftop farming in urban areas. NOTE: THIS TOPIC IS ALSO OFFERED ON LIVINGSTON CAMPUS.

 

TIME, THE FAMILIAR STRANGER

355:201:S8 07807         MW5 (3:55 – 5:15)           HCK-113 D/C                        INSTRUCTOR: D. STANTON

What is time? For Plato, time was a "moving image of eternity." Isaac Newton conceived of time as an absolute flow, existing independently of all events and processes. To the Symbolists, time was all that was corrosive; time was death. British physicist, Julian Barbour, argues that time is merely an illusion. The truth is that at present, there is little consensus regarding an exact definition or even an adequate description of time. Our course takes its name from a groundbreaking study by noted scholar J.T. Fraser whose life's work focused on the notion that great insights are often gained by foregrounding a consideration of time in all disciplines. This class will offer students exciting opportunities for research in the broadest array of topics including, but not in any way limited to the psychology of time, biological time, time in the arts, the sociology of time, time in business, and the history of time. 

 

PROPAGANDA AND POWER

355:201:T2 07183        TTH2 (10:55 – 12:15)         HCK-126 D/C                        INSTRUCTOR: A. ALTER

Jesuits first used the word propaganda in the 16th century as a response to the Protestant Reformation. They set out to reconvert all those who strayed from the Catholic fold and propagated the faith to new believers around the world. Until the early 20th century, something “propagated” was neither insidious nor underhanded, referring to the pride of making a product of exceptional quality.  World War I, however, changed all that, giving the word “propaganda” its modern meaning:  lies, especially lies told by your very own government. This course will begin by reading articles about the history of propaganda in film since World War I focusing on its unique possibilities in this medium. Students will then undertake a research project that examines fictional or non-fictional forms of propaganda, researching and examining its mission and context. 

 

MUSIC, EXPRESSION AND PERFORMANCE

355:201:T3 06888        TTH3 (12:35 – 1:55)      HCK-126 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: E. GARDNER

This is an exciting, collaborative course designed to accommodate serious and meaningful research on a wide variety of topics. These have included important projects about the influence and significance of musicians like Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley and George Harrison; fusion in Jazz and World Music; protest music; music and racism; fan behavior; film scoring; file sharing; the creativity of amateur musicians; and even stage fright.  Accomplished musicians who can use their expertise to shape a research topic, and students who love music and want to explore a topic that they are interested in, are equally welcome!

  

SURVIVAL

355:201:T6 16238        TTH4 (2:15 – 3:35)         HCK-209 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: J. LOEB

 At one point during his catastrophic 1913 Polar Expedition, explorer Douglass Mawson stood 100 miles from base camp.  He had just buried his friend in the Antarctic ice; his dogs were dead, he was sick and snow-blind.   Only then did he discover that his rotted and frostbitten soles had become detached from his feet.  Alone in the frigid wasteland, Mawson strapped his soles back onto his feet…  and kept going.   Truly, it is astonishing what human beings can endure.  Faced with desperate odds, raging cataclysm, or heartbreaking loss, we somehow manage to survive the most devastating of life’s traumas and challenges.  How?  How, rather than sink into terror or despair, does the human spirit find the capacity to survive, to endure, and to heal?  Students are invited to explore this question in a way that fascinates or inspires them.  Topics might include but are not limited to: wartime experience; emotional/physical abuse; personal loss or tragedy; perseverance and career comebacks; psychosocial and spiritual factors, etc.  

 

FROM PRINT TO FILM


355:201:T7 20485         TTH4 (2:15 - 3:35)           HCK-204 D/C                        INSTRUCTOR: L. HEALEY

You read the book; you saw the movie. Which did you prefer? What changed from print to film? In this course, you will research and write about the process of film adaptation. Your main project for the class will be a research paper based on the critical discussion surrounding a classic film of your choice, subject to instructor approval.

 

MUSIC AND DANCE

355:201:U4 11184        TTH5 (3:55 – 5:15)         HCK-213 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: E. GARDNER

Music and Dance explores a range of collaborative possibilities between musicians, dancers and choreographers. We seek to understand how artists work together to create performances and how music and dance affect us individually and culturally. This rich topic is ideal for dance and music majors interested in an opportunity to build on their expertise and knowledge, but a background in the arts is not essential, and there is no requirement to write about both music and dance in individual research papers. Possible research topics include specific dance forms and the iconic artists associated with them; music and dance in film, on Broadway and in smaller, more rarified venues; gender in dance and music; commercialism and its effect on the arts; anorexia and body image; dance and music therapy etc.

  

ANIMAL ECOLOGY

355:201:U6 10157        TTH6 (5:35 – 6:55)         HCK-209 D/C                       INSTRUCTOR: T. BRENNAN

 Human population growth has led to massive changes to the planet caused by housing, feeding, and sustaining seven billion people. The environmental and ethical impact of this outsized influence of humans on the planetary ecosystem has inevitably created lots of problems for the other species with which they share the Earth. In this course, students will study the interrelationships of animals with their communities and environments. Student research options include topics such as animal testing, animals in captivity, breeding, animal behavior and training, domestic animal management, zoo management, endangered species, wilderness preservation, animal health and treatment, animal communication, animal rights, animals in therapy, etc.

PALS

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The Program in American Language Studies (PALS) provides superior English language instruction to non-native English speakers for academic, professional, business, and social/acculturation purposes.

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WPI

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Rutgers University’s Writing Program Institute supports middle school and high school teachers and administrators through on-site professional development, outreach programs, and on campus workshops..

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Contact Us

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Rutgers Writing Program
Murray Hall, Room 108
510 George Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901 


TEL (848) 932-7570
FAX (732) 932-3094
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